shop blog

« Retief Goosen's Transitions Championship winning clubs | Back to Main | Rory McIlroy's Golf Clubs »

March 24, 2009

New hybrid wins another convert

Posted at 10:19 AM by David Dusek | Categories: Adam Scott, Custom Fitting, Hybrid Clubs, Todd Hamilton

Todd_hamilton_royal_troon My first experience with a hybrid club didn't work out so well. I bought one in 2004 after Todd Hamilton famously used his all over Royal Troon to win the British Open. After he chipped from the fairway to within a few feet in his playoff with Ernie Els (right), hybrids were all the rage.

But the hybrid I bought to replace my 3-iron wound up being too iron-like. True, it was more forgiving than the 3-iron, but the head was small, and it just didn't instill a lot of confidence when I looked at it from the address position. After about three months, it was gone and the 3-iron was back.

But I recently decided it was time for me to give hybrids another try. After all, even Adam Scott, one of golf's best ball strikers, has yanked a long-iron in favor of a Titleist 909H hybrid. "It's just so easy," he told me recently. "I just feel that getting this hybrid into a par 5 is like chalk and cheese compared to a 2-iron."

I've never carried a 2-iron, but as a 10-handicapper I'm pretty good with my long irons. Still, after seeing GOLF Magazine's recent article about new hybrids and thinking about what Scott said, I figured it was time to give the Swiss Army Knife of golf clubs another try.

So this weekend, before my first round of the season, I once again pulled my 3-iron and dropped in a new 21° hybrid. The results were amazing, and my 3-iron has found a new home in the back of my closet.

Even though I played in a turtleneck, wool vest and wind shirt, my first tee shot with the hybrid flew higher and straighter than the 3-iron would have. From light rough on the next hole, the club muscled a shot effortlessly into the air, and I watched it land softly on the green.

I even used it to chip. The first time I tried, from the fairway, the 21° of loft got the ball into the air with backspin, and it stopped more quickly than I had anticipated. Later, I intentionally hit my hybrid chips a little thin, and the ball rolled beautifully.

Here are a few things to think about if you are in the market for a hybrid:

1. Do you sweep or dig? If you take small divots with your irons, or no divots at all, a fairway wood-style hybrid will probably match your sweeping swing well. If you have a steep angle of attack and take large divots, an iron-style hybrid might be better.

2. Pay attention to the shaft. My first hybrid had a steel shaft that was different from both my irons and my woods. The hybrid I tried this weekend had a graphite shaft that was very similar to the one in my 5-wood. Getting fitted for the right shaft is crucial.

3. Watch the gaps. Ideally, you want consistent gaps between your irons. If you remove an iron in favor of a hybrid, pay close attention to the gap between your highest-lofted fairway wood and the hybrid, as well as the hybrid and your longest iron. A hybrid with the same loft as a 3-iron will likely fly a little farther because the shaft will likely be a little longer. At the very least, get to a launch monitor and learn your precise distances with each club. If an awkward gap is created between your new hybrid and your longest iron, talk to a club fitter about the best solution to the problem.

Padraig Harrington's hybrid tips | Research and buy hybrids in our new Equipment Finder

 

(Photo by Al Tielemans/SI)

Add your comment, speak your mind

Log in to one or more of your social networks. Click on Share to choose how your post will be shared to friends.





Subscribe To Blog Headlines

Related Links

Shop Blog Archives

To view posts from a particular day,
simply select the date below.

August 2014
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31

<< Previous Months


Popular Tags